Live animal migration tracks

Follow the migrations of these animals as they cross continents and oceans…or even visit your backyard, favorite beach, or local ball field.

Some species we study are large enough to carry satellite tracking tags.  Satellite tags allow us to track animals in near real-time, providing us with important connectivity information including migratory pathways, locations of stop-over and wintering areas, and the similarity (or dissimilarity) among individuals. We are testing new tracking technologies, working with researchers and volunteers throughout North America, and discovering critical information about migratory connectivity of birds.

Click on each individual point for more information about the bird and the location (including the date).

Looking for 2015 migrations? Visit our archived 2015 migration page.
Black-bellied Plovers View full screen

Team: North Slope (2015): Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center; Lee Tibbitts and Dan Ruthrauff, USGS Alaska Science CenterNome, Seward Peninsula (2016): Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center; Phil Bruner, Brigham Young University–Hawaii
Tags: 5g Solar-powered Argos Satellite Transmitters, Microwave Telemetry. Duty cycle: 8 hours on, 48 hours off.
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs.

For more information, read our blogs from the expedition.

Black-crowned Night Herons View full screen

Team: Amy Scarpignato, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
Tags: 9.5g Solar-powered Argos Satellite Transmitters, Microwave Telemetry. Duty cycle: 5 hours on, 24 hours off.
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs.

For more information, read our blogs from the expedition.

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Broad-winged Hawks View full screen

Team: Erin Bayne and Jesse Watson, University of Alberta; Peter Marra, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
Tags: 9.5g Solar-powered Satellite Transmitters, Microwave Telemetry. Duty cycle: 6 hours on, 24 hours off.
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs and NSERC.

For more information, read our blogs from the expedition.

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Long-billed Curlews, Texas View full screen

Team: Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Peter Marra, Amy Scarpignato, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center; David Newstead, Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries Program, Coastal Bird Program
Tags: 9.5g Solar-powered Satellite Transmitters, Microwave Telemetry. Duty cycle: 8 hours on, 48 hours off.
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs.

For more information, read our blogs from the expedition.

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Long-billed Curlew, Georgia View full screen

Team: Tim Keyes and team, Georgia Department of Natural Resources; Autumn-Lynn Harrison Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center; David Newstead, Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries Program, Coastal Bird Program, Felicia Sanders, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
Tags: 9.5g Solar-powered Satellite Transmitters, Microwave Telemetry. Duty cycle: 5 hours on, 24 hours off.
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Wolf Island National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

For more information, read our blogs from the expedition.

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Pacific Loons View full screen

Team: Joel Schumtz, Brian Uher-Koch, Ray Buchheit, Andrew Myers, USGS Alaska Science Center; Scott Ford, Avian Specialty Veterinary Services; Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
Tags: 44g Argos Implantable Avian Transmitters Microwave Telemetry. Duty cycle: 4 hours on, 48 hours off.
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs, Oregon State University, and BRI.

For more information, read our blogs from the expedition.

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